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docs:guide-user:troubleshooting:generic.debrick [2018/09/15 14:04]
jw0914v2 ToC Cleanup | Removed broken external links | Added external link names
docs:guide-user:troubleshooting:generic.debrick [2018/09/15 15:15] (current)
jw0914v2 [by Vavasik] Fixed broken list numbering
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 The full originals by vavasik can be found [[http://​translate.google.de/​translate?​hl=de&​ie=UTF-8&​sl=auto&​tl=en&​u=http://​webcache.googleusercontent.com/​search%3Fq%3Dcache:​wZfxY3lVVfQJ:​forum.ixbt.com/​topic.cgi%253Fid%253D14:​49819%2Bhttp://​forum.ixbt.com/​topic.cgi%253Fid%253D14:​49819%26cd%3D1%26hl%3Den%26ct%3Dclnk%26source%3Dwww.google.com&​prev=_t|here]]. The full originals by vavasik can be found [[http://​translate.google.de/​translate?​hl=de&​ie=UTF-8&​sl=auto&​tl=en&​u=http://​webcache.googleusercontent.com/​search%3Fq%3Dcache:​wZfxY3lVVfQJ:​forum.ixbt.com/​topic.cgi%253Fid%253D14:​49819%2Bhttp://​forum.ixbt.com/​topic.cgi%253Fid%253D14:​49819%26cd%3D1%26hl%3Den%26ct%3Dclnk%26source%3Dwww.google.com&​prev=_t|here]].
  
-  - Open the Router’s case +==== SPI FlashROM ====
-  - Find an IC SPI Flash SPANSION S25FL064A (Package SO3 016 wide), it is located on the backside of the router PCB. +
-    - There are some variations regarding the IC used by D-LINK. In my particular case, the IC is from a different player. It is a ST Microelectronics chip labeled 5P64V6P 7B469 VS, but the pin outs are exactly the same. +
-  - To record to flash chip it is necessary to build a simple cable that is connected in one side, to PARALEL PORT of your computer, and on other side you have to SOLDERING THE WIRES DIRECTLY INTO IC PINS.+
  
-<​code>​+=== Supported === 
 +  * **ST Microelectronic:​** 
 +    * **M25P10** //​(128kB)// ​ |  **M25P20** //​(256kB)// ​ |  **M25P40** //​(512kB)// ​ |  **M25P80** //​(1MB)// ​ |  **M25P16** //​(2MB)// ​ |  **M25P32** //(4MB)// |  **M25P64** //​(8MB)// ​ |  **M25P128** //​(16MB)//​ 
 + 
 +==== Flashing ==== 
 +  - Open the Router’s case\\ \\ 
 +  - Find an IC SPI Flash SPANSION S25FL064A (Package SO3 016 wide), it is located on the backside of the router PCB. 
 +    - There are some variations regarding the IC used by D-LINK.  
 +      * In my particular case, the IC is from a different player. It is a ST Microelectronics chip labeled 5P64V6P 7B469 VS, but the pin outs are exactly the same.\\ \\ 
 +  - To record to flash chip it is necessary to build a simple cable that is connected in one side, to PARALEL PORT of your computer, and on other side you have to SOLDERING THE WIRES DIRECTLY INTO IC PINS. <​code>​
 DB25 # PIN---------------RESISTOR---------------FLASH IC # PIN DB25 # PIN---------------RESISTOR---------------FLASH IC # PIN
  
Line 108: Line 114:
 |----------- {recommended cable length = 120 mm} ------------| |----------- {recommended cable length = 120 mm} ------------|
 </​code>​ </​code>​
- +    - It is also necessary to provide some external power supply (during the flashing process the router’s power adapter connector should be NOT INSERTED). So, in my case I decided to use a simple 3 x AAA 1.2 Volt NiMH battery holder that I assembled together with the cable itself. 
-It is also necessary to provide some external power supply (during the flashing process the router’s power adapter connector should be NOT INSERTED). So, in my case I decided to use a simple 3 x AAA 1.2 Volt NiMH battery holder that I assembled together with the cable itself. +    ​- ​Since the batteries are placed in a serial arrange, the final voltage of the set is 3.6 Volt. <​code>​
- +
-Since the batteries are placed in a serial arrange, the final voltage of the set is 3.6 Volt. +
- +
-<​code>​+
 FLASH IC # PIN--------------------BATTERY ARRAY--------------------FLASH IC # PIN FLASH IC # PIN--------------------BATTERY ARRAY--------------------FLASH IC # PIN
  
 10 ----------------[ - 1.2 Volt +]----[ - 1.2 Volt +]----[ - 1.2 Volt +]--------------- 2 10 ----------------[ - 1.2 Volt +]----[ - 1.2 Volt +]----[ - 1.2 Volt +]--------------- 2
 </​code>​ </​code>​
- +  ​- It is not necessary but it could prove useful, to be capable to follow the boot process through serial console. In order to achieve that it is recommended to install some connections pins into the empty board holes related to JP1 connector. You can use the pins from old computer parts. <​code>​
-  ​It is not necessary but it could prove useful, to be capable to follow the boot process through serial console. In order to achieve that it is recommended to install some connections pins into the empty board holes related to JP1 connector. You can use the pins from old computer parts. +
- +
-<​code>​+
 DIR 825 SERIAL PINOUTS (connector JP1) is: DIR 825 SERIAL PINOUTS (connector JP1) is:
  
Line 129: Line 128:
 PIN 4 -> GND PIN 4 -> GND
 </​code>​ </​code>​
- +  ​- Use a TTL to RS-232 cable to connect to serial console. A good, easy and cheap option is to buy a USB to Phone cable like the model CA-42. Here in Brazil this cable can be found for about US$ 3.00. 
-  ​<​5> ​Use a TTL to RS-232 cable to connect to serial console. A good, easy and cheap option is to buy a USB to Phone cable like the model CA-42. Here in Brazil this cable can be found for about US$ 3.00. +    ​- ​Since you have the cable all you have to do is to cut off the Phone connector side and to identify the GROUNDTXand RX wires. ​ 
- +      * It is quite easy and the web is plenty of guides that teach how to do that. 
-Since you have the cable all you have to do is to cut off the Phone connector side and to identify the GROUNDTX and RX wires. It is quite easy and the web is plenty of guides that teach how to do that. +    ​- ​Use a terminal emulator software (I like PuTTY) configured as follows
- +      * **Speed (baud):** 115200 
-Use a terminal emulator software (I like PuTTY) configured as follow+      * **Data Bits:** 
- +      * **Stop Bits:** 
-Speed (baud) 115200 +      * **Parity:** None 
-Data Bits 8 +      * **Flow Control:** XON / XOFF \\ \\ 
-Stop Bits 1 +  ​Now that the LPT ADAPTER is done and its wires are soldering to the chip, you have to connect the other side to LPT interface of your computer and also to connect the 3,6V external battery array. ​ 
-Parity None +    * You should ​see the light of some LEDs on board.\\ \\ 
-Flow Control XON / XOFF +  ​- If everything ​was done properly, download the software ​''​SPIPGMW'' ​([[http://​rayer.ic.cz/​programm/​programm.htm#​SPIPGM|<​broken link>]]) and run it in a DOS session. ​ 
- +    - Check if the chip is correctly identified: ''​SPIPGMW.EXE /i''​ 
-  ​* 6 Now that the LPT ADAPTER is done and its wires are soldering to the chip, you have to connect the other side to LPT interface of your computer and also to connect the 3,6V external battery array. You must see the light of some LEDs on board. +      * In my particular case, the software shows the ST Microelectronics chip id.  
-  ​* 7 So, if everything ​is done properly, download the software SPIPGMW ([[http://​rayer.ic.cz/​programm/​programm.htm#​SPIPGM|<​broken link>]]) and run it in a DOS session. ​It is good use the key “i” in order to check if the chip is correctly identified+        * If you see “unknown chip” there is a problem with LPT cable connection, //check connections and try again//! 
- +      * Program should show: <​code>​
-SPIPGMW.EXE /i +
- +
-Program should show: +
-<​code>​+
 SPI connected to LPT port at I / O base address: 378h, SCK pulse width: t 0us FlashROM JEDEC ID, type: 010216h Spansion S25FL064A (8MB) SPI connected to LPT port at I / O base address: 378h, SCK pulse width: t 0us FlashROM JEDEC ID, type: 010216h Spansion S25FL064A (8MB)
 </​code>​ </​code>​
- +  ​- Download and save the appropriated image toDIR-825. 
-In my particular case, the software shows the ST Microelectronics chip id. If you see “unknown chip” there is a problem with LPT cable connection, check connections and try again! +  - Before flashing the image it is necessary to allow recording in chip with: ''​SPIPGMW.EXE /u''​ 
- +  ​Prior to recording it is good to make a cleanup. Erase chip with: ''​SPIPGMW.EXE /e''​ 
-  *  8 - Download and save the appropriated image toDIR-825. +  ​Now it is time to program chip: ''​SPIPGMW.EXE /p file_name''​ 
-  ​*  9 - Before flashing the image it is necessary to allow recording in chip with the key “u” ​SPIPGMW.EXE /u +  - Dump chip content to a file with: ''​SPIPGMW.EXE /d filename_1''​\\ \\ 
-  ​* 10 – Prior to recording it is good to make a cleanup. Erase chip with the key “e” ​SPIPGMW.EXE /e +  - Check the success of recording operation by comparing recorded file and recently dumped file: ''​fc / b filename_1 filename_2''​  
-  ​* 11 – Now it is time to program chip with key “p”  ​SPIPGMW.EXE /p file_name +    * Files must have exactly the //same// content.\\ \\ 
-  ​* 12 - Dump chip content to a file with key file “d”  ​SPIPGMW.EXE /d filename_1 +  - Disconnect LPT cable and external power supply, ​then try to boot.  
-  ​* 13 - Check the success of recording operation by comparing recorded file and recently dumped file fc / b filename_1 filename_2Files must have exactly the same content. +    * Look at the serial console terminal program and follow the boot process. Luckily everything will work fine.
-  ​* 14 - Disconnect LPT cable and external power supply, try to boot. Look at the serial console terminal program and follow the boot process. Luckily everything will work fine. +
- +
-^SPI FlashROM supported^ +
-| ST Microelectronic:​ | +
-| M25P10 (128kB) | +
-| M25P20 (256kB)| +
-| M25P40 (512kB)| +
-| M25P80 (1MB)| +
-| M25P16 (2MB)| +
-| M25P32 (4MB)| +
-| M25P64 (8MB)| +
-| M25P128 (16MB)| +
  
 ===== Write via USB ===== ===== Write via USB =====
docs/guide-user/troubleshooting/generic.debrick.1537020277.txt.gz · Last modified: 2018/09/15 14:04 by jw0914v2