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docs:guide-user:additional-software:beginners-build-guide [2018/08/12 17:54]
per Replace LEDE->OpenWRT
docs:guide-user:additional-software:beginners-build-guide [2018/08/14 07:19] (current)
per [Beginners guide to building your own firmware]
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 The main advantage of building your own firmware is that it compresses the files, so that you will have room for much more stuff. It is particularly noticeable on routers with 16 MB flash RAM or less. It also lets you change some options that can only be changed at build time, for instance the features included in BusyBox and the block size of SquashFS. Larger block size will give better compression,​ but may also slow down the loading of files. The main advantage of building your own firmware is that it compresses the files, so that you will have room for much more stuff. It is particularly noticeable on routers with 16 MB flash RAM or less. It also lets you change some options that can only be changed at build time, for instance the features included in BusyBox and the block size of SquashFS. Larger block size will give better compression,​ but may also slow down the loading of files.
  
 +Alternative guides to achieving the same goal:
 +[[docs:​guide-developer:​quickstart-build-images|Quick Image Building Guide]], [[docs:​guide-user:​additional-software:​imagebuilder|Using the Image Builder]].
 ===== 1 - Getting a Linux server (for Windows user)===== ===== 1 - Getting a Linux server (for Windows user)=====
 If you already have a Debian/​Ubuntu server you can skip to [[docs:​guide-user:​additional-software:​beginners-build-guide#​compiling_openwrt|part 2]]. If you already have a Debian/​Ubuntu server you can skip to [[docs:​guide-user:​additional-software:​beginners-build-guide#​compiling_openwrt|part 2]].
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   - Start Oracle VM Virtualbox   - Start Oracle VM Virtualbox
   - Click New   - Click New
-  - Name: OpenWRT+  - Name: OpenWrt
   - Type: Linux   - Type: Linux
   - Version: Debian (64-bit). See [[https://​superuser.com/​questions/​866962/​why-does-virtualbox-only-have-32-bit-option-no-64-bit-option-on-windows-7|here]] if 64-bit is not available.   - Version: Debian (64-bit). See [[https://​superuser.com/​questions/​866962/​why-does-virtualbox-only-have-32-bit-option-no-64-bit-option-on-windows-7|here]] if 64-bit is not available.
   - Hard Disk: Select "Use an existing virtual hard disk file" and choose the Debian .vdi file you just unpacked.   - Hard Disk: Select "Use an existing virtual hard disk file" and choose the Debian .vdi file you just unpacked.
   - Click Create   - Click Create
-  - Right click on the OpenWRT ​image and click Settings+  - Right click on the OpenWrt ​image and click Settings
   - Select General, Advanced, Shared Clipboard: Bidirectional   - Select General, Advanced, Shared Clipboard: Bidirectional
   - Select Shared Folders   - Select Shared Folders
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 ==== 1.4 Initial Debian setup ==== ==== 1.4 Initial Debian setup ====
-  - Select the OpenWRT ​image and click Start+  - Select the OpenWrt ​image and click Start
   - Wait for it to finish booting and click osboxes.org   - Wait for it to finish booting and click osboxes.org
   - Password: osboxes.org   - Password: osboxes.org
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 Your virtual Debian server should now be set up correctly for following the rest of the guide. Congratulations. As a bonus, you now have a fully functional Linux computer that you can use for anything, and with the added safety of running it as a virtual machine. If you let the resolution match your monitor and select View/​Full-screen mode there is almost no difference from a standalone Linux computer. Your virtual Debian server should now be set up correctly for following the rest of the guide. Congratulations. As a bonus, you now have a fully functional Linux computer that you can use for anything, and with the added safety of running it as a virtual machine. If you let the resolution match your monitor and select View/​Full-screen mode there is almost no difference from a standalone Linux computer.
-===== 2 - Compiling ​OpenWRT ​=====+===== 2 - Compiling ​OpenWrt ​=====
  
 ==== 2.1 Initial check out of the code ==== ==== 2.1 Initial check out of the code ====
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 For users: For users:
-  * [[docs:​guide-user:​additional-software:​imagebuilder|More indepth guide to the building process]]+  * [[docs:​guide-user:​additional-software:​imagebuilder|Using the Image Builder]]
  
 Mostly for developers: Mostly for developers:
docs/guide-user/additional-software/beginners-build-guide.1534096475.txt.gz · Last modified: 2018/08/12 17:54 by per